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Landing pages: the benefits for accountants

A landing page is where a visitor lands after clicking on an advert or promotional link.

Unlike other website pages, a landing page exists for one reason – to get people to move onto the next step in the buying cycle. This could be filling in a form to request a call back, signing up for newsletter or downloading a guide.

You quite often see these in e-commerce. For example, I got this email from the travel magazine Lonely Planet.

Landing pages best practice

The ‘Buy Now’ link takes me to this landing page.

How to create a good landing page

This page has been specifically created to encourage me to part with some cash. There’s a descriptive headline, a subheadline that gives more detail, a list of the benefits of subscribing, a relevant image and finally a big, pink button telling me to ‘Buy Now’.

It focuses on one thing – a Lonely Planet subscription – because it’s safe to assume that if I bothered to click a link in an email about a Lonely Planet subscription, that’s what I’m interested in. I don’t care about the great offers on Gardens Illustrated or BBC History Magazine so there’s no point telling me about them.

Once here, I have two choices – buy a subscription or leave the page. It’s as simple as that.

Landing pages for accountants

Now this is all well and good but how is this relevant to accountants, I hear you ask.

While you are unlikely to sell services through your website, landing pages are great way to help convince potential clients that you are the right accountant for them.

For example, you specialise in accounting for landlords and have spent some money on a Google AdWords campaign to promote your services to new landlords. You want to encourage people who have clicked on your advert to book a meeting.

You could just link to the ‘Contact us’ page on your site but if a potential client has to write an email or pick up the phone to get in touch, it’s more effort and they could easily lose interest.

Instead, a landing page with some details about the service and a form embedded in it has more focus and could be more successful.

Hopefully you are convinced about the benefits of landing pages, but how do you create a good one?

Writing a great landing page

I follow a formula that’s very similar to the Lonely Planet example.

Headline

This will be the first thing people read so it has to be engaging and relevant. The headline doesn’t have to be anything fancy or clever, just something your reader identifies with. Think about the problems you solve rather than boasting about how great you are.

If the landing page is for paid search, the text needs to be very similar to the headline on the advert.

Our landlord accountant could be as simple as: Accounting support for first-time landlords.

Subheadline

The subheadline backs up your headline. If the headline is a promise of what you do, the subheadline should tell the reader how you deliver it.

Example: Property tax and finance advice from day one.

Main text

Explain the benefits of your service. The reader cares more about the impact of what you do rather than how you do it. So if your service saves people time, money, stress or whatever – tell them.

You are trying to persuade people to do something so you need to get your point across effectively.You can do this by:

  • cutting out the waffle
  • using the language of your audience
  • making the text easy to scan by using bullet points, bold and headings

Call to action

Finish with a call to action which simply tells the reader what you want them to do next.
Read more about writing the perfect call to action.

Landing page design

A good landing page is not just about the words you use. The design can also help conversions.

Clear the clutter

This is one case where you don’t want people going off and exploring your site so get rid of distractions such as the main navigation links.

Keep it focussed

The reader should have two options – take action or leave the page. Offering more than one call to action can be confusing and reduce your conversion rate.

Images

Only use images if they are relevant – they are not there just to look pretty. For example, a picture of your ebook is more useful than a stock image of a calculator.

Need a hand?

We can write, build and track landing pages. Drop us a line to talk about using them in your marketing campaigns.

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